Category Archives: Ghana

A bank robbery!

Yesterday, two company employees were returning back to our office in Adabraka after collecting a large sum of money from Fidelity Bank at Ridge. While on the move, a strange sound was being heard from one of the vehicle tires. The driver eventually came to a halt in order to investigate the source of the sound. In the mean time the vehicle was being followed by two men on a motorbike.

As soon as the driver left the vehicle, he was attacked by the men on the motorbike. Following this the other employee left the car to assist the driver and this led to the money that was collected from Fidelity bank to be snatched through the door that was left ajar.

Investigation has begun, however, the Police were not able to help thus far; BROLL Ghana, who brags of impeccable building management services, could not assist on the matter despite them being the company managing the building and finally Fidelity bank, does not even have a CCTV camera system to provide footage of the early chase.

The culprits stuck a fabricated object onto the tire when the vehicle halted at the traffic light (images attached below). The fabricated object was made of rubber, some nails and an empty coke can.

The bank manager later mentioned that this sort of crime had happened before and that there was a discussion on this recurring theft with other bank managers (DISCUSSION AND NOT ACTION) I shall not delve into the flawed security we are suffering from and how BROLL and Fidelity Bank take their customers for granted, but rather I wish to provide tips on how to avoid being the next victim.

  1. Be on alert when leaving your bank in case you are being watched
  2. Check your car tires before sitting in your car
  3. Keep an eye on your mirror in case you are being followed
  4. Be alert while at a traffic light, as this was when the object that enabled the crime to enfold  was stuck beneath the tire
  5. If at any point you hear a strange sound from your vehicle, try your best to only stop at a police station or a public area, because the moment you stop, the thieves will stomp on you.
PhotoGrid_1391125767011

fabricated object stuck onto car tire to aid robbery

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Along my trail

A long and silent wail

With emotions so weak and frail

I seek a comforting sail

But I surface with no avail

 

Tears silently escape

From lids that sadly drape

To cover my eyes like a cape

And seal my sorrow with a tape

 

My pain is tender and quail

But my pride will always prevail

To keep balance to my quivering rail

And conceal my sadness without any fail

 

Feelings lodged within me like a grape

Confusing me providing no escape

Questions sink to the back of my nape

And answers whizzing by like a slape

 

I drift back to a comforting trail

Following through my anointed grail

Engulfed with strength from The One we hail

Marked by clarity beyond any fail.


Lessons I learn and teach myself.

During my education in the University, when the going got hard, a fleeting moment would come upon me where I would question what I was doing and ask myself if it was worth all the hard work. With an adamant yes, I would push that moment of weakness far back and strive ahead.

Now I’m in the real world. Facing the real facts of life. No cushions to fall on, no trampoline to bounce back up with, no marshmallow clouds and vanilla moons, no sweet lemon crusted sun or bubble gum blue sky. It’s the real thing where whatever I say is taken for what it is and beyond, where my actions are the only cutlasses paving my future.

I still get those fleeting moments of confusion where I get the urge to recline and hide like an ostrich. And then a little voice within me reminds me that reclining would not make the world stop moving and that reclining would not make people and events around me evaporate. It would only throw me into quick sand where I will not have help because I would be sinking alone, voluntarily. And by alone, not only will the people around me not be able to help me, but even I would not be able to help myself.

It’s during these moments of weakness that I realise what it means for me to be the mature individual that I have grown to become and the woman that everyone sees me as. I realise that shutting out “my world” would not make things easier, it would only show how weak I am with my inability to push forward while maintaining my ground and still accepting everyone around me. And then I realise what it really means to be strong. The ability to stand my ground, suck the negativity with a cushion, reshape that cushion and throw it back out.

I have learned different ways of coping and adjusting, sometimes it’s by the support of someone close and other times it’s by simply doing something that allows me a mental corridor where I leave the negativity behind. No one has the ability to set back those moments if I do not accept to let go.

With all that’s said, the core of what ultimately makes me more confident again about my moment of weakness towards the thoughts of reclining is faith. Having the ultimate faith that Allah will make things better for me. Entrusting him to take care of things. That always brings peace to my heart and mind. I’m learning how simple it is to do that now. It involves pausing the racing thoughts in my mind and just pushing matters towards Him. It brings amazing peace to my heart.

Spice


A taste of tropical delight

As walking through the streets of Accra basking in it’s golden sun, it is quite common to come across a coconut cart. For a traditional experience, you can have a taste of Ghana’s excotic bliss right out of the coconut. With a cutlass and a brave pair of hands, the mega nut is opened from the top to give acess to a thirst quenshing tropical experience.

Coconut cart in Accra

The shell is cracked from the top to allow to you to drink right out of the nut.

The mega nut is then opened in half for its meat to be eaten. The cracked piece of shell from the top of the coconut is saved or a small piece of its husk is conveniently cut to enable you to spoon the meat out of the nut.

Spoon out the coconut meat with a piece of the shell or husk

More recently, advanced coconut carts are being spotted in Accra. It deprives you of a traditional coconut experience but it is quite convenient. The coconut is opened using a cutlass as can be seen in the far right end of the picture below.

An innovative coconut cart

The coconut is then placed on the peaked middle area of the cart where the water is immediately cooled and then poured into a plastic cup while the coconut marrow is cleanly separated from its shell.

Machine extracting the coconut marrow

The coconut meat and juice are presented to you in a modest plastic bag advertising the healthy advantages of a coconut .

 

For an amount of GH ¢ 1 (US $ 0.67) you get to drink your cooled coconut juice out of a cup and your coconut meat sliced and clean. I must say the traditional way of eating a coconut is fun when you have time for it.

The two carts featured above were seen on Osu, Oxford Street in Accra. They were actually by each other. The guy at the regular cart made an effort to acknowledge his competitor by offering straws to his customers instead of having them drink right out of the nut. Buying a coconut from a regular cart would cost you GH ¢ 0.50 (US $ 0.33).

I did not quite enjoy my coconut juice because the cup fell as I was attempting to snap the picture for this post. My jeans did appear to enjoy the juice though, at least it did not go to a complete waste.

Spice


Coffins with style from Ghana

For the Ga tribe in coastal Ghana, funerals are a time of mourning, but also of celebration. The Ga people believe that when their loved ones die, they move on into another life — and the Ga make sure they do so in style. They honor their dead with brightly colored coffins that celebrate the way they lived.

 

To see more artistic coffins. Click Here!

(Sources: Ghana Web, Damn Cool Pics)


You’ll know you are in Ghana when…

You’ll know you are in Ghana when…
  1. Medicine is advertised on TV like candy
  2. People say “your head” or “your face” as retorts
  3. You see a truck embedded with maxi speakers and a bunch of people in the truck dancing while moving on the road
  4. You see a bunch of plastic chairs and tables casually organized at the side of the road with maxi speakers as a “café”
  5. People have ‘waakye’ (rice & beans) for breakfast
  6. Appointments are never met on time
  7. Students walk 15 minutes late into class as though they are 15 minutes early
  8. You can shop while stuck in traffic
  9. You find a “don’t walk on grass” sign where there is no grass
  10. You find a “no hawkers” sign on a street filled with hawkers
  11. You find a “throw litter in bins” next to overflowing bins
  12. Almost all the food joints have fried rice and chicken on the menu
  13. Employees miss work when it rains and expect their employers to accept it as a valid reason
  14. You find herbal medicine advertised on billboards with visual directions on where to apply them on one’s body, no matter the part.
  15. You see ubiquitous “Post No Bill” signs plastered or painted on walls.
  16. It is common to block streets on weekends in order to set up tents for funerals.
  17. Coffins are shaped as per the deceased worldly profession eg: a fisherman may be buried in a fish shaped coffin.
  18. People  urinate on the “do not urinate” signs
  19. O – is added to everything .. Shut-up-O!
  20. You know exactly what a “knock” is and how it feels!
  21. Alcoholic beverages are advertised on TV and streets like they are soft drinks

Representing Ghana!

Sugar & Spice